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Academic Policies

Read our Academic Policies below, or download the Academic Calendar to view the policies starting on page 19.

NOTE: These academic policies were in effect at the time of publication. Booth University College reserves the right to change them without notice. 

Academic Advising 

The mission of academic advising is to help students fulfill their educational goals, graduate in a timely fashion and, more broadly, to attain established college outcomes. Faculty advisors seek to create vital links between the University College community and the students, articulate the institution’s academic purposes, and help students understand and negotiate the institution’s rules, regulations, curricula and requirements. The Booth University College academic advising program is based on relationships of shared understanding and shared responsibility. It focuses on student development and student success. Students are in charge of reaching these goals, but Faculty Advisors will help in whatever way possible. 

Advisors encourage students to consider larger questions about educational goals and help students plan their courses of study. Shared responsibility is important at the institutional level since forging connections between academic matters, student matters, and support services encourages students to become involved in university college life and be enthusiastic members of the student community. To fulfill this mission, advisors are committed to the following goals: 

  1. To provide timely and accurate academic advising and information in a supportive environment, where students and advisors share in the responsibility for academic progress; 
  2. To support and enhance student learning and achievement; 
  3. To develop links to ensure seamless navigation of the Booth educational program from admission to graduation. 

Academic advising is the process by which students and advisors work together to set goals for their academic life. This is a collaborative process, but, ultimately, students are responsible for their educational program and experience at Booth University College. As students pursue a degree at Booth University College they will develop key skills that will assist in the development of lifetime learning. Advisors do not “prescribe” answers or programs for students, but encourage them to engage in academic studies that they enjoy and in which they can do well. 

  • During the first week of the academic year (or semester) advisors will be available for meetings with each of their advisees. Advisors review students’ files (stored electronically) and help establish goals for the first semester with students. Students will be assigned to Faculty Advisors familiar with their indicated program of study. 
  • Students may make an appointment at any time during the semester if they require or desire advice. Students should meet with their advisors when making course and program changes, at the end of each semester or when making choices for courses for subsequent semesters. Students should clearly explain questions or requests. 

Students Should… 

  • be familiar with the Booth University College student information system; 
  • schedule regular appointments and/or contacts during each semester; 
  • be on time for scheduled appointments; 
  • come to appointments prepared with questions and/or topics for discussion; 
  • accept responsibility for decisions and actions; 
  • be open to developing and clarifying personal values and goals; 
  • be knowledgeable about university college programs, policies, procedures, and opportunities as appropriate; 
  • keep a record of academic progress and goals; 
  • be courteous and plan ahead (schedule appointments early and cancel or reschedule if necessary); 
  • be active learners by participating fully in the advising experience; 
  • gather all relevant decision-making information; 
  • organize official records and make them accessible to advisors; 
  • be familiar with the academic calendar and be aware of deadline dates; 
  • seek help when needed and use appropriate campus resources. 

When students are meeting advisors for course selection, they should bring a list of possible courses to the session. Planning ahead will make time with advisors more productive. 

Academic Appeals 

The purpose of the Academic Appeals process is to ensure fair and equitable treatment of students in a decision of academic matters such as the dispute of an assignment or final grade, program discontinuance, probation, plagiarism or academic discipline. 

A. Appeal Categories 

Appeal of assignment grades

  • If a student thinks that a grade assignment is unwarranted, he/she must first discuss the matter with the professor. If not satisfied, the student must then discuss the situation with the Academic Dean or designate within 10 business days of receiving the assignment grade. The Academic Dean or designate will mediate a solution. If no acceptable solution can be found the Academic Dean or designate will render a decision based on the available data. The student and instructor will be notified of the Academic Dean or designates decision in writing within five business days. If the student believes an error in process, procedure or application of policy has occurred, the student may initiate an appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals through the President or designate. Appeals regarding an assignment grade must be filed within five business days of receiving a decision from the Academic Dean or designate. 

Appeal of final course grades

  • Once submitted to the Registrar’s Office, final grades may be changed only by the Academic Dean. Appeals regarding a final course grade must be filed within six weeks of the distribution of final grades for the course. If a student thinks that a final course grade is unwarranted, he/she must first discuss the matter with the professor. If not satisfied, the student must then discuss the situation with the Academic Dean or designate who will mediate a solution. If no acceptable solution can be found the Academic Dean or designate will render a decision based on the available data. The student and instructor will be notified of the Academic Dean or designates decision in writing within five business days. A copy of the decision will be sent to the Registrar, Program Head and President. If the student believes an error in process, procedure or application of policy has occurred, the student may initiate an appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals through the President or designate. 

Appeal of decisions regarding program discontinuance

  • If a student thinks that a decision regarding program discontinuance is unwarranted, he/she must first discuss the matter with the Program Head. If not satisfied, the student must then discuss the situation with the Academic Dean or designate within three weeks of receiving written notification of program discontinuance by email or signed for mail. The Academic Dean or designate will review the facts and render a decision based on the available data. The student and Program Head will be notified of the Academic Dean or designates decision in writing. A copy of the decision will be sent to the Registrar and President. If the student believes an error in process, procedure or the application of policy has occurred, the student may initiate an appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals through the President or designate. Appeals regarding decisions of program discontinuance must be filed within six weeks of receiving a decision from the Academic Dean or designate. 

Appeal of decisions regarding probation or dismissal from the University College

  • If a student thinks that a decision regarding probation or dismissal from the University College is unwarranted, he/she must first discuss the matter with the Academic Dean or designate. If the student believes an error in process, procedure or the application of policy has occurred, the student may initiate an appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals through the President or designate. Appeals regarding decisions of probation or dismissal from the University College must be filed within six weeks of receiving written notification from the University College.

Appeal of decisions regarding a finding of a breach of academic integrity or the application of academic discipline (Note: issues related to violation of academic integrity are addressed in the Academic Integrity policy) 

  • If a student thinks that a finding that academic integrity was breached is unwarranted, and/or that imposed academic discipline is unwarranted, he/she may initiate an appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals through the President or designate. Appeals regarding the finding of academic dishonesty or the application of academic discipline must be filed within five business days of receiving a decision from the Academic Dean or designate. 

B. Appeal to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals 

Appeals to the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals must be submitted in writing to the President or designate and must state explicitly the prima facie grounds of the appeal (i.e., must identify an error in the application of policy, process, procedure, discipline or the finding of academic dishonesty). Simply disagreeing with the decision and/or disciplinary action is not a ground for an appeal. Appeals must be accompanied by a $50 fee paid to the Office of the Registrar, which is refundable if the appeal is successful. The fee must be paid before the President or designate receives the appeal letter. 

Upon receipt of the appeal and proof of payment from the Office of the Registrar, the President or designate will review the written submission to determine whether a clear ground of appeal has been stated. In the absence of a specific and prima facie ground for appeal, the President or designate will advise the student in writing that the appeal will not be heard. This notice will be given within five business days of receiving the submission. If a specific and prima facie ground for appeal has been stated in the written submission, the President or designate will convene the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals to render a decision on the appeal. Once convened, the Chair of the Committee will contact the student to explain the Committee’s role, outline the appeal process, schedule a date for the appeal to be heard and confirm other details as needed. 

The decision of the Senate Committee on Academic Appeals is final and will be communicated in writing to the President or designate, student, faculty member (if appropriate), Program Head, Registrar and Vice President Academic within 20 business days of the written appeal being accepted by the President or designate. 

Academic Evaluation 

Instructors have primary responsibility for the evaluation of students’ academic performance in courses and for the maintenance of a healthy learning environment in the classroom. Cordial and intellectually positive relationships between students and instructors are to be sought and supported. When a dispute arises regarding academic performance, the aim of the University College is always to encourage resolution in a way that promotes positive attitudes toward learning, and respect for the expertise and authority of the instructor. In what follows, these principles are to be recognized and preserved. 

Instructors have responsibility for evaluating students’ achievement in a course. An instructor may refuse to accept late assignments, or impose a grade penalty for lateness. An instructor may deny students the opportunity to rewrite tests and assignments. Failure to abide by the attendance and preparation expectations articulated in course syllabi may lead to a loss of part or all of the marks for a course. Instructors have responsibility for maintaining quality learning environments in the classroom. If student behaviour interferes, the instructor will counsel the student in order to seek a behavioural change. 

Students who believe they have been treated unjustly in connection with the above should first seek to have the dispute resolved by appealing directly to the instructor. If the dispute is not resolved after direct appeal to the instructor, students have the right to appeal to the Academic Dean. 

Academic Integrity 

It is a serious offence to present a piece of work for course credit as one’s own if the work or a portion thereof was done by some other person (plagiarism). Actions of plagiarism harm both the student and the reputation of the University College. Plagiarism or any form of cheating in examinations or term tests (e.g. crib notes) is subject to serious academic penalty that may include loss of part or all of the marks for an assignment/test, failure in the course, dismissal from the University College, or other serious consequences. Plagiarism or cheating in a course in which a student is cross-registered with the University of Manitoba may lead to disciplinary action by the University according to its policies. 

To plagiarize is to take ideas or words of another person and pass them off as one’s own. In short, it is stealing something intangible rather than an object. Obviously it is not necessary to state the source of well-known or easily verifiable facts, but students are expected to acknowledge the sources of ideas and expressions they use in their written work, whether quoted directly or paraphrased. This applies to diagrams, statistical tables and the like, as well as to written material and materials or information from Internet sources. Failure to do so constitutes plagiarism. It will also be considered plagiarism and/or cheating if a student submits an assignment in whole or in part by someone other than him/herself, or copies the answer or answers of another student in any test, examination, or take-home assignment. 

At the beginning of their program of study, all students are required to complete the prescribed plagiarism tutorial.
Instructors are required to report all allegations of plagiarism or cheating to the Academic Dean before a grade is assigned. The original assignment is submitted to the Academic Dean. 

The Academic Dean will chair a joint meeting of student and instructor to hear both the allegations and the student’s response to the allegations. The Academic Dean will then make a determination whether or not plagiarism or cheating has in fact occurred and decide on appropriate disciplinary measures. The student and instructor will be notified of the Academic Dean’s decision in writing. A copy of the decision will be sent to the Registrar and University College President. The student has the right to appeal the decision of the Academic Dean (see Academic Appeals). 

Academic Load 

Students must be enrolled for a minimum of 9 credit hours per semester in order to be classified as full-time. The normal full- time academic load is 15 credit hours (up to 18 credit hours for practicum students) per semester. Students desiring to enroll for more than 15 credit hours (or 18 credit hours for practicum students) in a semester must have a CGPA of 3.5 or higher and approval of the Program Head and Academic Dean. 

Academic Probation 

The academic progress and continuance of students is reviewed at the end of each academic session/term. Students whose CGPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on Academic Probation and informed so by the Registrar. Those who do not raise their CGPA to a passing level after having been placed on Academic Probation will be subject to suspension for a minimum of one term. Reapplication to the University College must be made in writing to the Academic Dean. Students with a CGPA of 1.49 or lower may be dismissed at the end of any session/term from the University College. 

While on academic probation, students are required to meet regularly with their academic advisor and seek remedial help available at the University College. Students on academic probation may be required to register for a limited number of credit hours; students with a CGPA of 1.49 or lower will be permitted to register for a maximum of 12 credit hours per semester until their CGPA has risen to 2.00. 

Students on academic probation are not allowed to participate in intercollegiate athletic teams or to serve in student leadership positions. 

Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) 

Booth University College may grant University transfer credit for most AP and IB courses. The minimum AP result required is 3; however some departments may stipulate a higher minimum score. The minimum IB score required is 5. The first step in applying for transfer credit is to ensure that an official copy of your results is forwarded to the Registrar’s Office. IB candidates should authorize IB to send their results to Booth University College ( registration number 035666).The transfer credit must be authorized by the faculty to which the student has been admitted as being appropriate for inclusion in that particular degree program. The Registrar’s office will notify the student of the outcome. 

Assignment Deadlines 

All academic course requirements must be completed by the times specified by the instructor in the course syllabus, unless extensions are granted or alternate arrangements are made by special permission of the instructor. Instructors may impose a grade penalty for late submissions or refuse to accept late assignments. At the beginning of courses, instructors will indicate policies regarding extensions, make-up tests and late assignments in writing. (See Incomplete Grade section). No assignments will be received after the last day of the exam period for regular session courses or after the published session end date for School for Continuing Studies courses unless a formal Incomplete Grade/Time Extension Request has been granted by the instructor and submitted by the student. Supplemental work to improve a student’s grade may be possible at the discretion of the instructor, prior to the submission of the final grade to the Registrar’s Office. Supplemental work after the submission of the final grade is not allowed. 

Auditing 

An instructor may permit a limited number of students to audit a course. An auditing student may attend and participate in the lecture and discussion portions of a course but will not receive academic credit for it. Students who audit courses are expected to attend classes regularly but are not permitted to submit assignments or sit for examinations. If students pay the required fees and attend a minimum of 70% of classes, the letters AU will appear on transcripts and permanent records as an indication that a course has been audited. Students who do not meet the attendance requirements for a course will not receive the AU designation on transcripts and permanent records. No record of the course will be made on transcripts and permanent records. 

Students may not change their status in a course from credit to audit or from audit to credit after the Registration Revision Period. Booth University College students who take 15 credit hours per semester may audit one additional course per semester. The audit fee for persons in other classifications is noted under Financial Information in the University College Calendar. 

Course Grading

Instructors prepare syllabi for their courses indicating the amount and nature of work proposed. For on-campus courses, syllabi are distributed to students during the first week of classes. For School for Continuing Studies courses (online and hybrid), syllabi are posted online prior to the start of the course. Syllabi include a notification of the weight each assignment will have for the determination of final grades and the general requirements for courses. Changes in amount, nature or grading of work or general requirements subsequent to the first week of classes (in regular session courses) or subsequent to the intensive class time (in School for Continuing Studies hybrid courses) must have the consensus agreement of the class. 

Any test(s) which have an aggregate value of more than 20% of the total value of the course may not be scheduled to take place during the 14 calendar days ending with the last day of classes in the term during the regular session. No project or assignment may be announced during the 14 calendar days ending with the last day of classes in the term during the regular session, unless contained in the course syllabus. 

Students can expect that within a reasonable time after the submission of assignments a grade will be assigned and that they will be notified of the grade. Final grades include evaluation of final examinations, tests and assignments, and may include such items as class participation, presentations and discussion. Instructors will return or show all evaluated work to students including comments and grades assigned, but may return or retain a final examination at their discretion. 

Revision of a final grade, once it has been submitted to the Registrar’s Office, is possible only with the permission of the Academic Dean. 

A Booth University College grade has the following components: 

  1. Letter Grades and Equivalent Grade Points 
  2. Credit Hours 
  3. Grade Point Average (GPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) 

Letter Grades and Equivalent Grade Points 

1. Grade Points 

Grade points are a translation of letter grades into numeric values to facilitate the calculation of students’ average performance. The University College does not use a standard percentage scale to correspond to the letter grade and grade points. If an instructor intends to use a percentage scale, that scale will be included in the course syllabus. 

A+ (4.5) Exceptional performance with evidence of outstanding original thinking, superior organization, exceptional capacity to analyze and synthesize; a superior grasp of the subject matter with sound critical evaluations; evidence of an extensive knowledge base. A final grade of A+ may be awarded only with the approval of the Academic Dean. 

A (4.0) Excellent performance with evidence of excellent original thinking, excellent organization, excellent ability to analyze and synthesize; an excellent grasp of the subject matter with sound critical evaluations; evidence of an extensive knowledge base. 

B+ (3.5) Very good performance with evidence of original thinking, very good organization, demonstrated ability to analyze and synthesize; a very good grasp of the subject matter; evidence of good critical judgment, a very good understanding of the relevant issues under examination; very good familiarity with the relevant literature. 

B (3.0) Good performance with evidence of a good grasp of the subject matter; evidence of critical capacity, good analytical ability, a good understanding of the relevant issues under examination; evidence of good familiarity with the relevant literature. 

C+ (2.5) Satisfactory performance with evidence of a satisfactory grasp of the subject matter; evidence of critical capacity, demonstrated analytical ability, an understanding of the relevant issues under examination; evidence of familiarity with the relevant literature. 

C (2.0) Adequate performance with evidence of an adequate grasp of the subject matter; some evidence of critical capacity, an ability to develop solutions to simple problems found in the material; evidence of familiarity with some of the relevant literature. 

D (1.0) Marginal performance with evidence of marginal familiarity with the subject matter and some evidence that critical and analytical skills have been used. 

F (0) Inadequate performance with little evidence of even a superficial understanding of the subject matter; serious weaknesses in critical and analytical skills; limited or irrelevant use of the literature; failure to satisfy course requirements. 

P/NP (Pass/No Pass) 

The grades P and NP are given for certain courses. Students in these courses receive credit if assigned work is completed satisfactorily. Students who do not complete work satisfactorily will not receive credit. Grade points are not calculated for the grades P and NP. 

2. Credit Hours 

The relative academic weight of a course is measured in credit hours. Normally, a six credit hour course meets three hours per week for the duration of the regular session (Fall/Winter) while a three credit hour course meets for three hours per week for the duration of one semester. A two credit hour course meets for two hours per week. Credit hours are a useful way of measuring academic load. For example, a full-time student carries a minimum of 9 credit hours. For every instructional hour, students are expected to study two additional hours. 

Credit hours are also used to measure progress towards graduation. When students pass courses—i.e., when a grade of D or higher is achieved—credit will be given for the number of credit hours assigned to a particular course. These are referred to as Credits Earned. When students do not pass, no hours are credited and no credit is obtained toward graduation. The number of credit hours required to obtain Booth University College certificates, diplomas and degrees are published in the academic calendar under individual programs. 

Level Classification 

Following enrolment in Fall and Winter semesters, the Registrar will determine each full-time and part-time student’s classification. 

Level 1: 0-30 credit hours completed

Level 2: 31-60 credit hours completed

Level 3: 61-90 credit hours completed

Level 4: 91 or more credit hours completed 

BSW – After Degree 

Level 3: 0-39 

Level 4: 40-75

3. Grade Point Average (GPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
GPA
is calculated by adding the Weighted Grade Points per course taken in a semester/term, and dividing by the number of Credit Hours Earned in a semester/term. 

  • The Weighted Grade Point is the product of Grade Points earned multiplied by Credit Hours Earned. 
  • The Grade Point Average (GPA) is obtained by dividing the total Weighted Grade Points by the total number of Credits Earned in a semester/term. 
  • The Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) is obtained by dividing the total Weighted Grade Point Average by Credits Earned for all courses taken. 

Dean’s Honour List 

At the end of each regular session, the Academic Dean will publish the “Dean’s List,” honouring full-time students who have earned a GPA of 3.7 or higher. Eligibility for the list is defined as those who take a minimum of 24 credits by any learning mode (School for Continuing Studies or regular campus-based courses) in a 12 month period, May – April. 

Debarment for Academic Reasons 

In consultation with the instructor or faculty supervisor, the Academic Dean may debar students from classes, laboratories, practica, and/or examinations for persistent non-attendance, failure to produce assignments to the satisfaction of the instructor, or disruptive behaviour. An instructor who wishes to initiate debarment procedures will consult with the Academic Dean and make a formal request for debarment to the Academic Dean. The student will be given an opportunity to meet with the Academic Dean to discuss the request. The decision of the Academic Dean will be final. Students so debarred will fail the course. 

Debarment for Other Reasons 

Students who do not obtain College-approved financial arrangements for all outstanding financial obligations to the University College or who fail to honour arrangements made previously, may be removed or debarred from courses, prohibited from writing final examinations, dismissed from the University College, and assigned a failing grade for all course(s) in which they are registered. 

Degree Program Admission and Continuance as a Student 

Students who have completed 60 hours of credit without qualifying for admission to a degree program will be subject to dismissal from the University College. 

Directed Study

A Directed Study is a course in the University College Calendar which is offered in a tutorial format, without formal lectures or class engagement. A Directed Study may only be taken by permission of the instructor and the approval of appropriate Program Heads/Directors, Registrar and the Academic Dean. Since Directed Study is not a preferred pedagogical method of the University College, the following conditions normally apply: a student may not hold more than six credits of Directed Study in an undergraduate degree; the course must be one that is not offered in the current course schedule and is required for graduation; a minimum of 30 credits of course work must have already been completed in order to be eligible for a Directed Study; a minimum CGPA of 2.5 is required in order to be eligible for a Directed Study; elective courses may not be taken by Directed Study. 

A request for a Directed Study will only be approved if the student has been unable to take the course in its normal rotation due to unavoidable circumstances (scheduling conflicts or personal convenience do not constitute adequate grounds for a 

Directed Study). Students are advised to discuss the possibility of taking a Directed Study with their advisor well in advance of the term in which it is anticipated to occur and should not assume that a request can be accommodated. A request form is available from the Registrar. 

Dismissal 

The Academic Dean may recommend that a student be dismissed from the University College during a semester for lack of achievement and/or participation in the academic program. Before making this recommendation, normally the Dean will consult with faculty and meet with the student, warning them of a possible dismissal. 

If the Academic Dean recommends to the President that a student be dismissed from the University College on academic grounds, the student will be notified in writing, with copies sent to the President and Registrar. The student may appeal to the President, who will decide on a case-by-case basis the means by which appeals are heard. The decision of the President will be final. 

Upon academic dismissal, residential students must leave the residence promptly. Students dismissed from the University College on academic grounds may apply for readmission following the lapse of one semester. 

Earning a Second Degree 

A second baccalaureate degree may be earned if all requirements are met and a minimum of 60 additional credits are earned. The same limitations on transfer credit will apply to the second degree, that is, no more than 45 credits in a three year degree or 60 credits in a four year degree may be included in the second degree. 

Educational Travel 

All expenses associated with Educational Travel are the responsibility of the student. Normally, a maximum of 6 credit hours of educational travel are permitted within any degree program. 

Final Examinations 

Students who are registered in courses for which a final examination is scheduled must write the examination at the time and in the place announced by the University College. Electronic devices are not allowed in an examination room. Students are not permitted to leave an examination within the first 30 minutes of the examination. Any students arriving more than 30 minutes after the commencement, but before the end, of a final examination scheduled by the University College, might not be permitted to write that examination. Failure to write a final examination as scheduled may result in a “0” for the examination, failure of the course, or other serious consequences. 

A student who is scheduled to write more than two final examinations on one day may file a request with the Registrar’s office to have one of those examinations rescheduled. The request must be submitted in writing to the Registrar within fourteen (14) days of the exam schedule being posted. The Registrar shall decide whether the request is granted. 

A student may file a petition for a deferred examination with the Academic Dean for reasons of illness or other disability, or for compassionate reasons, setting out the reasons for the deferral. The petition must be accompanied by a medical certificate or other appropriate documentation certifying the reason for the deferral, the inability of the student to write the examination at the scheduled time and, where possible, indicating the period of disability. On the basis of the evidence, the Academic Dean shall decide whether the petition is granted. The decision of the Academic Dean is final. 

Graduation Requirements 

The approval of the Board of Trustees, granted through the President on recommendation of faculty, is given to present certificates and to confer degrees on students who have fulfilled Booth University College graduation requirements. In summary form these requirements are: 

Academic Achievement Graduation from any University College program requires a student to achieve a passing grade (“D” or higher) in all courses required in the student’s program and an accumulated grade point average (CGPA) of 2.0 or higher in the course requirements of the program. Graduation from a Bachelor of Arts program requires a CGPA of 2.0 or higher and a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all courses in a student’s major. Graduation from the Bachelor of Social Work program requires a CGPA of 2.5 or higher and a grade of C+ (2.5) or higher in all Social Work courses. Graduation from the Bachelor of Business Administration program requires a CGPA of 2.0 or higher and a grade of C (2.0) or higher in all Business courses. Degree Students with a CGPA of 3.5 to 3.74 are graduated “With Distinction.” Degree Students with a CGPA of 3.75 or higher are graduated “With Great Distinction.” 

Participation in the Graduation Ceremony The privilege of participating in the graduation ceremony is given only to those who have fulfilled all graduation requirements. Exceptions are made only on the approval of the Dean and the President. 

Settled Accounts The University College graduates students whose financial obligations to the University College have been fully met and who have returned all library materials and other University College materials and property for which they have had responsibility. 

Exit Survey Students who have received Canada/Provincial student loans are required to complete an Exit Interview regarding their student loans before graduation. 

Letters of Permission 

Booth University College students desiring to take courses at other educational institutions and transfer them into their Booth University College program must complete the Request for Letter of Permission form. The form must have signed approval from the Program Head/Director and the Academic Dean. Courses taken by Letter of Permission will be entered on student records by course name and grade, and are calculated into CGPA’s at Booth University College. 

Letters of Permission for courses currently being taught in the regular term rotation will not normally be granted. Conflicts in scheduling are not grounds for approval of a Letter of Permission for such courses. 

Students are responsible to ensure that official transcripts for courses taken by Letter of Permission are issued to the Booth University College Registrar by the educational institutions so that student records contain the required official documents. Applicants for graduation must ensure that the final grade for a Letter of Permission course is received by the Booth University College Registrar six weeks prior to the anticipated graduation date. 

All grades recorded on a Booth University College student’s permanent record will match the Booth University College grading system. When a grade report for a student taking a course at another institution on a Booth University College Letter of Permission contains a grade that does not correspond to our grading system, that grade shall be changed to reflect a letter grade used by Booth University College. For example, a grade of C- would be recorded on a student’s Booth University College permanent record as C, B- as a B, A- as an A, D+ as a D, etc. 

Booth University College students whose program requires that they take courses by Letter of Permission or through Booth University College’s School for Continuing Studies and who carry 9 or more credit hours during a given semester will be classified as full-time Booth University College students for the semester, with all the rights and responsibilities pertaining thereto. 

Program Continuance 

Students whose performance falls below standards set for the program in which they are enrolled will receive a letter from the program coordinator/department head indicating that their program status is under review. Students whose performance is such that they will not be able to graduate from the program will not be allowed to continue in the program. The student will be notified of the program coordinator/department head’s decision in writing. A copy of the decision will be sent to the Registrar and Academic Dean. The student has the right to appeal a program discontinuance decision (see Academic Appeals). 

Program Declaration and Changes 

Students who choose to pursue a different program of study since declaring their interest at the time of admission, must inform the Office of the Registrar. Students who wish to add a program minor must also inform the Office of the Registrar. 

Readmission 

When a full-time or part-time student at Booth University College has chosen not to register for a course, or courses, for a period of 12 months or more, that student shall be required to apply for readmission to the University College. The application process for readmission may be abbreviated. The student may also be required to apply for readmission to a specific program. To be readmitted the student must fulfill University College and programmatic requirements in force at the time of readmission. 

Registration Revision 

For each academic session a Registration Revision Period will be established. During the Registration Revision Period, students may change course load without academic penalty and without records being entered on official transcripts or student records.
Students are permitted to enter a course after the Registration Revision Period only in exceptional circumstances and only with the permission of the instructor and the Academic Dean. Students must consult with their Academic Advisor and/or Program Coordinator/Department Chair before changing course registration. 

Repeating Courses 

Prior to graduation, students must repeat and pass any required course for which an F or NP was received. Any non- required course in which an F or NP was received may be repeated. Any course in which a grade of C or D was received may be repeated in order to improve the CGPA. A course may only be repeated once. A student will be permitted to repeat a maximum of 30 credit hours. Individual programs may have additional restrictions. 

If a course is repeated, permanent student records will indicate both the first and the repeated attempt. Grades for both attempts will be part of the permanent record. However, the hours will be credited and grade points calculated only for the attempt with the higher grade. 

Resubmission of Previous Course Work 

Work submitted in one course for credit may not be resubmitted in whole or in part in another course for credit unless approved by the instructor. 

Students with Disabilities 

Booth University College is dedicated to making every reasonable effort to help all students succeed in their academic pursuits. To this end, the University College will endeavor to ensure an accessible learning and working environment for students with documented disabilities. Barring undue hardship for the institution, supports and services will be provided to persons who have identified the nature of their disability to a representative from Student Services. Booth University College will ensure that all students with disabilities are considered for admission to the university college and to the programs for which they are academically qualified. 

1. Students are encouraged to declare the nature of their disability at the time of application and are guaranteed confidentiality and impartiality regarding their application. If the disability is not declared at the time of application to the University College, we strongly urge students to declare their disability within the first two weeks of classes if they wish to be considered for additional supports; otherwise, we cannot guarantee that Booth University College will be able to reasonably accommodate their needs in a timely fashion. 

2. The Booth University College Student Services department will assist students who have declared a disability with the appropriate accommodations (where applicable). The student should declare the nature of their disability to the Dean of Students and provide the appropriate documentation to complete the needs assessment. Documentation of a disability must be within the last five years. Once this documentation is provided, Student Services will meet with the student to further discuss the learning resources available and classroom needs, develop an accommodation plan for exams and determine what resources the university college can reasonably provide to assist the student. 

The Dean of Students will inform teaching faculty, department heads and the Academic Dean regarding any reasonable special arrangements necessary to accommodate the student. This shall be accomplished in a way that does not compromise the integrity of the course material and in a way that promotes equity. The Dean of Students will also inform the Registrar regarding any alterations to the official exam schedule that will be necessary to accommodate the student. 

Booth University College is responsible for maintaining the confidentiality of disability-related information, including limiting the distribution of that information to only those parties that require the information to determine the issue of accommodation. 

Time Extensions and Incomplete Grades 

Students who are unable to complete the term work prescribed for a course or field education practicum/internship may apply to the instructor no later than two weeks prior to the end of classes or practica, for an Incomplete Grade and time extension for completion of the work. It is understood that the student is to write the final examination at the scheduled time (if one is required in the course). 

A grade of Incomplete may be granted by the instructor only when the major portion of the course work (i.e., at least 50%) has been completed satisfactorily, but some requirement or requirements have not been completed. The request must have the approval of the instructor before it will be processed further. 

Students must pay an Incomplete Grade Fee of $50 per course. 

Taking into account the result of the final examination, the value of the term work completed, and the extent of the incomplete work, the instructor will calculate a temporary grade using a zero value for incomplete work. This grade, preceded by the letter “I” (e.g. IF, IB, INP, etc.) will be recorded on the appropriate grade sheet and forwarded to the Registrar.
If a final grade is not reported within one month of the extension deadline, the letter “I” will be dropped and the grade will remain as awarded. When circumstances warrant, the Academic Dean may extend the date by which an incomplete grade must be cleared. Students must submit a written request for such extensions, with the concurrence of the instructor, prior to the expiration of the maximum deadline date. 

Time Limit for Completion of Degree Programs 

Students must complete degree programs within ten years from beginning courses at Booth University College. The degree requirements in effect at the time of initial enrolment will apply. Students who choose not to enroll for a period of twelve months or longer must reapply for admission to Booth University College and may need to reapply to a program. Students must meet all requirements in force at the time of readmission. The ten year time limit from the time of first enrolment remains in force. In exceptional circumstances, a leave of absence may be granted with the approval of the Academic Dean. No leave of absence will be granted for more than twelve months. Students who have an approved leave of absence are not required to reapply for admission to the university or to the program. 

Transcripts 

The Registrar issues a transcript of grades to each student within a reasonable time following the end of the semester. This transcript indicates the courses in which the student was enrolled for the semester, the GPA for the semester and the CGPA. A report of grades is not issued to or for a student whose accounts with or responsibilities to the University College are not in order. This includes the payment of all fees, return of all library materials and community life commitments. Final grades are released by the Registrar. At their discretion, instructors may inform students of the final grades they have assigned. However, grades are not considered official until they have been released by the Registrar. 

Students wishing to transfer to another educational institution or who desire an official transcript indicating all courses taken and all grades obtained at Booth University College must submit a transcript request form to the Registrar, giving a minimum notice of one week. Near the beginning or the end of a semester, the period required to process transcript requests may be extended. The first official copy of a transcript is provided to students without charge. There is a charge for each additional official copy (see Financial Information). 

Transfer of Credit 

Students who have completed academic work at other post-secondary educational institutions may apply to receive transfer credit at Booth University College. A preliminary assessment of potential transfer credit should normally be made in the admission process and/or prior to enrolment. Transfer credit is awarded and applied to specific programs of study and may not be applicable to another program at Booth University College. If students change programs or concentrations, a new request for transfer credit must be made. 

Generally, credits ten years or less in age are considered acceptable for transfer. Courses taken longer than ten years ago will only be considered for transfer to a Booth University College degree program on a case-by-case basis. Departments may have more stringent requirements relating to the transfer of credit, particularly for courses in the disciplinary major. 

In order for transfer credit to be granted, students must have received a course grade of C or higher for each course for which transfer credit is considered. A grade of 60% will equal a grade of “C” for those colleges and universities that do not provide letter grades. If the institution at which previous study was done is an accredited college or university, full Booth University College credit may be granted, provided that the courses are comparable to those satisfying Booth University College requirements. 

Students desiring transfer credit must: 

  • arrange for the previous institution to issue an official copy of their transcript to Booth University College Admissions; 
  • attherequestoftheUniversityCollegeprovideadescriptionoftheworkdoneatthepreviousinstitution(e.g.,course description and course syllabus) 
  • specify the Booth University College program for which they wish transfer credits applied.

The Admissions office will notify students regarding their transfer credit assessment. When students secure degree program admission at Booth University College, transfer credits will be applied to their permanent records and transcripts as follows: 

  • thenameoftheinstitutionfromwhichcredithasbeentransferred;
  • the number of hours of credit allowed by Booth University College (the students’ level classification will be adjusted accordingly); 
  • thedistributionoftransferredcredittoacademicdepartments/divisions.

Transfer credits are not calculated into a student’s CGPA. Students should be aware that a limited number of credits will be transferable. 

All Transfer students in three-year degree programs may transfer in up to 45 credits, provided those credits meet degree requirements. Students may transfer up to 60 credits to a four-year degree including a maximum of 50% of the program (Major) requirement and a limit of 3 credit hours at the 400 level, provided those credits meet degree requirements. Transfer students are required to complete a minimum of 30 credit hours at Booth University College, with a minimum of 12 credit hours completed at the Winnipeg campus. Specific programs may have additional requirements. 

Transfer students should note that transfer credit granted by Booth University College may not be accepted by other colleges or universities, even if those colleges or universities grant transfer credit for studies completed at Booth University College. 

Credit will not be transferred into the Certificate of Christian Studies or the Certificate of Liberal Arts. Students in these programs may, however, be eligible for advanced standing in some disciplines, or exemption from otherwise required courses, on the basis of studies completed elsewhere. Students exempted from any required course must take another course in the appropriate department in its stead. 

Use of Personal Computers, Electronic Devices and Cell Phones in Booth Classrooms 

We consider the Booth classroom environment to be a special place of focused engagement between professors and fellow students. As such, electronic devices are allowed in the classroom only for the purposes of course instruction. The use of computers, the internet (including email), downloaded material, or other electronic devices such as cell phones require the express permission of the instructor. Social networking sites such as Facebook, Twitter, blogging and other related activities are not allowed in Booth classrooms. The use of personal computers and other electronic devices in the classroom is a privilege which may be withdrawn at the discretion of the instructor. 

Voluntary Withdrawal (VW) 

For each academic session a Registration Revision Period will be established. Courses dropped during this period are not regarded as withdrawals and are not recorded on official transcripts or in student records. When the Registration Revision Period has ended, students are permitted a Voluntary Withdrawal (VW) which is recorded on official transcripts and student records. When VW is entered, no hours are credited, nor are grade points calculated. To receive a voluntary withdrawal, students must complete the Registration Revision Form. 

For each academic session, there is a published date by which a student may withdraw voluntarily from a course. After this date, the instructor must assign a final grade to the student or a student may apply for a grade of Withdrawal (W) (see below). 

Waitlisted Courses 

In semesters where there is a course waitlist, priority course registration will be given to students who have paid their tuition by the stipulated fee deadline for that semester. If tuition is not received by the deadline, the student’s name will be dropped from the course and put on the waitlist, thereby opening a spot for a paid, waitlisted student to move into the course. 

Please note that the institution cannot guarantee a seat in courses for students on waitlists. Students are strongly advised to pay their tuition on time to secure their registration in the course(s). 

Withdrawal (W)

Permission to withdraw from a course after the Voluntary Withdrawal date will be granted only by special consideration from the Academic Dean. Only unusual circumstances (e.g., serious illness or death of a family member) will warrant such permission. Students are not permitted to withdraw from courses to avoid failure. When a W is recorded for a course, no hours are credited, nor are grade points calculated. 

Notification of Disclosure of Personal Information to Statistics Canada 

Statistics Canada is the national statistical agency. As such, Statistics Canada carries out hundreds of surveys each year on a wide range of matters, including education. It is essential to be able to follow students across time and institutions to understand, for example, the factors affecting enrolment demand at post-secondary institutions. The increased emphasis on accountability for public 

investment means that it is also important to understand ‘outcomes’. In order to conduct such studies, Statistics Canada asks all colleges and universities to provide data on students and graduates. 

Booth University College collects and provides to Statistics Canada the following information: Student Identification Information (student ID number), Student Contact Information (permanent address), Student Demographic Characteristics (gender, age, mother tongue, immigration status, country of citizenship) and Student Enrolment Information (program of study, start/end date in program, full/part time status at time of Fall entry, status in program, graduation date). 

The federal Statistics Act provides the legal authority for Statistics Canada to obtain access to personal information held by educational institutions. The information may be used for statistical purposes only, and the confidentiality provisions of the Statistics Act prevent the information from being released in any way that would identify a student. 

Students who do not wish to have their information used can ask Statistics Canada to remove their identifying information from the national database. On request by a student, Statistics Canada will delete an individual’s contact information (address or other personal identifiers) from the PSIS database. 

To make such a request, please contact: 

Institutional Surveys Section Centre for Education Statistics Statistics Canada
150 Tunney’s Pasture Driveway Main Building 2100-K 

Ottawa ON K1A 0T6
Or, via Email: PSIS-SIEP_contact@statcan.gc.ca 

Bachelor of Social Work Continuance Criteria

All students admitted to the Social Work Program must satisfy the continuance criteria to remain in the program. Performance is reviewed at the end of each semester. To remain in good standing in the Social Work Program, students are required to meet all of the following standards: 

  1. A minimum of C+ in each Social Work course in which the student was registered at the end of the last day of voluntary withdrawal from a course as stated in the University College Calendar. A minimum grade of C+ in field placement. 
  2. A minimum GPA of 2.5 each semester following acceptance into the program and a minimum CGPA of 2.5. 
  3. Maintain professional behaviour consistent with the current Code of Ethics of the Canadian Association of Social Workers. 
  4. Present as a positive, encouraging, and contributing team member, who possesses good interpersonal skills and is able to acknowledge and show willingness to work on areas of deficiency. 

All students in the BSW programs will need to sign to indicate their receipt and awareness of the continuance policy. The full policy is available online. 

Students who fail to meet the requirements of number 1 above will be permitted to repeat a given course only once and may not repeat more than two Social Work courses in the entire program. 

A student who fails to meet the requirements of number 2 above, but has a CGPA between 2.35 and 2.49 may continue in the program on social work program probation for one twelve month period. At the end of that twelve month period, the student must achieve a CGPA of at least 2.5 and a C+ in all social work courses or be subject to dismissal from the program. 

Students are required to exhibit values and behaviours that are compatible with the CASW Code of Ethics, which regulates not only professional conduct in relation to clients, but also in relation to colleagues. Recognizing that there are professional competencies and conduct not measurable by academic achievement alone, the Social Work Department reserves the right to ongoing monitoring and evaluation of students on their professional behaviour demonstrated both in and out of the classroom. Decisions regarding continuance in the program are based upon high standards of personal and professional conduct. 

Students may be dismissed from the program if judged to be unsuitable in aptitude and fitness for the profession. The following list of examples illustrates the criteria used to assess unsuitability in aptitude and fitness. This list is not all inclusive: inability to be actively assertive in the social work learning process; disruptive and inappropriate behaviour; behaving in a manner which endangers students, faculty, staff, practicum agency staff, clients and/or volunteers; consistent failure to meet generally accepted standards of professional conduct and personal integrity, as described in the CASW Code of Ethics; inability to form effective helping relationships (e.g., lack of respect for client self-determination, inability to be non-judgmental, discriminatory behaviour); lack of self-awareness that consistently interferes with ability to relate to others, especially clients; failure to respond appropriately to constructive criticism, supervision and instruction; any medical condition which affects an individual’s ability to perform as a social worker if that condition affects judgment; and convicted of or admitting to illegal activities that are inconsistent with the practice of social work or likely to harm clients (such as assault, sexual assault, fraud or drug trafficking). 

If students do not meet the Requirements for Continuance in the Social Work Program and termination is confirmed by the Program Head in writing, a copy of the correspondence is sent to the Academic Dean and Registrar. 

Students dismissed from the Social Work program for failing to achieve a grade of C+ in more than two social work courses will not be readmitted to the program. Students who are dismissed from the program for other reasons and who wish to reenter the program, may reapply to the program after the lapse of one twelve month period. Students will be required to apply for readmission to the social work program.